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Foster Wallace numa frase

por Quetzal, em 13.09.12

Começa assim a recensão no Guardian à biografia de David Foster Wallace:

 

"David Foster Wallace is one of those novelists who seem to push along the evolution of the form. You can recognise his prose style by a single sentence. He mixed high and low references, postmodern philosophy and popular television, maths theory and stoner slang. The people he wrote about tended to be well-educated and not very happy, for reasons that had something to do with the zeitgeist and something to do with America. Everything they experience has been packaged for them by one kind of experience-packager or another (advertisers, tennis academies, production companies, etc) and they respond to this fact with habitual irony that turns out to be just as hard to escape or stomach as the packaging."

 

O artigo completo aqui

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publicado às 16:31


Uma vida conturbada

por Quetzal, em 05.09.12

A propósito de uma nova biografia de David Foster Wallace, a New Yorker publicou um excerto da mesma:

 

At the end of 1989, David Foster Wallace was admitted to McLean Hospital, the psychiatric hospital associated with Harvard University, for substance addiction. He was twenty-seven years old and increasingly desperate for help. He had already experienced literary fame with his college novel, “The Broom of the System,” and sunk into obscurity with his postmodern short-story cabinet of wonders, “Girl with Curious Hair” (twenty-two hundred copies sold in hardcover). His most recent stop, as a graduate student in philosophy at Harvard, had lasted only a few weeks. His private life was hardly less uneven. He had attempted suicide the year before, in his family home, and had also gone from being a marijuana addict to an alcoholic, mostly drinking alone and in front of the television. Most dreadfully, he felt that he could no longer write well. He was unsure whether the problem was lack of focus, lack of material, or a lack of ambition. Granada House was to be the improbable solution to this problem, altering his approach to his work and putting him on the road to producing, in remarkably short order, his masterpiece, “Infinite Jest.”

 



Read more http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2012/09/an-excerpt-from-every-love-story-is-a-ghost-story-a-life-of-david-foster-wallace.html#ixzz25bQq3YkQ

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publicado às 14:45


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